Background: To date, the mitochondrial function has been related to several pathways involved in the cellular aging process. Dietary supplements might have reciprocal and multilevel interactions with mitochondria network; however, no systematic review assessed the role of different nutraceuticals in mitochondria modification of healthy older adults. Aim: To assess the effects of different dietary supplements on mitochondria modifications in older adults. Methods: On February 22, 2022, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and Cochrane were systematically searched from inception for randomized controlled trials (RCTs). According to PICO model, we considered healthy older adults as participants, nutraceutical treatment as intervention, any treatment as comparator, mitochondrial modifications as outcome. Jadad scale was used for the quality assessment. Results: Altogether, 8489 records were identified and screened until 6 studies were included. A total of 201 healthy older adults were included in the systematic review (mean age ranged from 67.0 ± 1.0 years to 76.0 ± 5.6 years). The dietary supplements assessed were sodium nitrite, N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, hydrogen-rich water, nicotinamide riboside, urolithin A, and whey protein powder. Positive effects were reported in terms of mitochondrial oxidative and antioxidant capacity, volume, bioenergetic capacity, and mitochondrial transcriptome based on the nutritional supplements. The quality assessment underlined that all the studies included were of good quality. Discussion: Although dietary supplements might provide positive effects on mitochondria modifications, few studies are currently available in this field. Conclusion: Further studies are needed to better elucidate the reciprocal and multilevel interactions between nutraceuticals, mitochondria, and environmental stressors in healthy older adults.

Impact of nutraceuticals and dietary supplements on mitochondria modifications in healthy aging: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials

Lippi L.;Uberti F.;Folli A.;d'Abrosca F.;de Sire A.;Invernizzi M.
Ultimo
2022-01-01

Abstract

Background: To date, the mitochondrial function has been related to several pathways involved in the cellular aging process. Dietary supplements might have reciprocal and multilevel interactions with mitochondria network; however, no systematic review assessed the role of different nutraceuticals in mitochondria modification of healthy older adults. Aim: To assess the effects of different dietary supplements on mitochondria modifications in older adults. Methods: On February 22, 2022, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and Cochrane were systematically searched from inception for randomized controlled trials (RCTs). According to PICO model, we considered healthy older adults as participants, nutraceutical treatment as intervention, any treatment as comparator, mitochondrial modifications as outcome. Jadad scale was used for the quality assessment. Results: Altogether, 8489 records were identified and screened until 6 studies were included. A total of 201 healthy older adults were included in the systematic review (mean age ranged from 67.0 ± 1.0 years to 76.0 ± 5.6 years). The dietary supplements assessed were sodium nitrite, N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, hydrogen-rich water, nicotinamide riboside, urolithin A, and whey protein powder. Positive effects were reported in terms of mitochondrial oxidative and antioxidant capacity, volume, bioenergetic capacity, and mitochondrial transcriptome based on the nutritional supplements. The quality assessment underlined that all the studies included were of good quality. Discussion: Although dietary supplements might provide positive effects on mitochondria modifications, few studies are currently available in this field. Conclusion: Further studies are needed to better elucidate the reciprocal and multilevel interactions between nutraceuticals, mitochondria, and environmental stressors in healthy older adults.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11579/145810
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